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. maybe this shows it is very positive from the standpoint of the economy, if you use dynamic scoring. if you use statics deploring it is not and cannot so well. -- static scoring it is not going to come out so well. i have a question for the other witness. you said this in your statement tionhis is aasnab. the obvious question is whether or not there are sufficient jobs for average americans and illegal immigrants. the answer is no. >> as i indicated to us recently. latere have a participation rate we have a supply of low-skilled labor. it appears that what do is leapfrogging those individuals. we have millions upon millions of americans, not just black americans, but millions upon millions who do not have a job right now. i think it is a good idea to inform -- to reform immigration system but regard must be given to the fact that we have an over abundance of people not working today. we are at rates we have not sn in 80, 75 years. it is astonishing. if we have regularize asian of a greater pool of individuals who can compete on a one by one basis with americans here today those indi
of tumultuous, russia's president is coming under controver controversy. while russia's economy hadn't performed badly last year, falling commodity prices risk pushing the country into recession. these comments come just hours after president putin threatened to fire officials for not following his orders on public spending. geoff cutmore is outside this event. what are you hearing about these concerns and the russian economy overnight? >> reporter: absolutely. fascinating issue. we clearly see some risks emerging in the russian government at this point. and i just want to put that issue to one side for a moment. because i have with me li jiaoung. he is a former chinese minister. i'm fortunate to get the opportunity to talk to him at this event. thanks very much for speaking to me. if i could just start off by asking you, clearly, the world has been focused on the terrorist events in boston and this tragic, very un pleasaplea event. i wonder if you could dwifs a perspective from the chinese point of view here because nobody wants to see terrorism and in particular i think the chinese have an int
includes a substantial drop we experienced with the recession in 2008 and 2009 and a fairly week economy since then. it says that people do value hard copy correspondence from businesses. they want that information in hard copy and they're resisting the idea of going totally digital. we've heard of people that did do that and either piss manied a payment or got nervous and said hey, start those bills back up again. don't write the obituary for first class mail. it accounts for $28 billion of revenue for the postal service today and i guarantee you it's the going to be around for a long while. the most promising part of our business in terms of growth is package delivery, which is up ricin threat. mail got delivered. you saw what happened with hurricane sandy, the mail got delivered. day in and day out, do an excellent job and the postal service plays an important role in the american economy but today it has a business model that is broken. the good thus -- news is that it can be fixed. it requires we ask fundamental questions about what kind of postal service is best for america in the
each other's lives. it is of a free market economy that grants everyone a fair chance and an unfettered start in the race of life. it is of a voluntary civil society that strengthens our commuters, protects the vulnerable, and minds the gaps to make sure no one gets left behind. and it is of a just tolerance and sustainable federal government that protects and complements free enterprise and civil society rather than presuming to replace them. this vision will not realize itself. the left, the inertia of the status quo, and the entire economy of this city stand a raid against it. realizing it will sometimes require conservatives to take on entrenched interests and policies and political third rail. many of these will be interests traditionally aligned with and financially generous to establishments within both political parties become sometimes it will require us to stand up for those that no one else will. the unborn child in the womb, the poor student in the failing school, the reformed father of my wishing in prison, the single mom trapped in poverty, and the splintering neighborhood
to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let in people crossing our borders who take away jobs. our approach is balanced. the border security triggers are strong, but achievable. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz eakin has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.7 trillion. we wanted this legislati
and the free enterprise piece of this which gives our economy most vigor and i would advise people that are preparing to take the nationalization test, that's a choice by the educational foundation to understand our history and language, one of the questions that will be there, what is the economic system of the united states? the answer to that is free enterprise capitalism. that's what gives our economy its vigor. and when we move away, when we move towards government management of our economy, government bailouts, government deciding who is too big to allow o fail, so much of our economy loses its vigor and we lose some of the promise of the great american civilization. another piece of this also that i speak to relatively often, mr. speaker, and that is american vigor and last component of the american exceptionalism that i'll list here tonight. american vigor, where does that come from? well, we have natural-born american citizens that are part of the civilization and culture. and they are -- and these natural-born american citizens are the did he sent ants who came here with
. part of it is the economy. improving economy in the united states tends to attract people as well. we just haven't seen that, but monitor those flms -- numbers. we have -- the thing that troubles me the most is the smugglers who do this for profit, who are taking creative routes either up through the bahamas, we're seeing haitians being run through puerto rico right now. so it's a constant battle as the smugglers get smarter and daring. they are smaller than the land border. >> the smuggler industry, for lack of a better term, is that on the increase, is that on the decrease? what's the trend? it's an recollection spencive undertaking. my understanding is they charge thousands of dollars per person they bring. is that something we've seen an increase in or decrease and if we've seen a decrease, is it because of economic factors? how do we stop these? it sounds like a fast boat through the middle of the caribbean is not something we would necessarily stop. >> i think flow of migrants, it's similar to the flow of drugs. people are very creative. yes, we've seen an increase in those peop
$100, and in september of 2011, copper price a reflection of the week call for the global economy, china news earlier this week, bearish, copper prices down 6%. if you're looking for gains, the agricultural sector saw some, and, and natural gas of 4 present. and someone you did the action in today's session. and $100 from the close of around $400 a troy ounce. and gold will average 1450 a troy ounce, in 2014. we also see reports of stronger jewelry demand, gold has come down significantly, some buyers stepping in at these levels and copper falling out of favor of this week on weaker reports out of china and also copper is down 6%. lots of volatility, wrapping up the week more muted reaction. melissa: let's check the markets and go to the stock exchange. lauren simonetti is standing by. >> the volatility sandra is talking about is the volatility we are seeing here on wall street. what a week. the dow can't seem to stay or get into the positive at this hour but the nasdaq and the s&p are higher, this has been the worst week of the year for all three major averages, the worst week si
it is harming the economy to pay too much tax? >> yeah. we all know that. the other point is that we have a big fragmented tax system. so i want to add up not just federal income taxes but there is federal, state income taxes, local income taxes, property taxes, estate taxes real estate transer it taxes, sales taxes. taxes you pay for your employees. when you add it up you're likely paying more than you think. the alternative minimum tax to make sure people don't end up paying nothing, we need an alternative maximum so make sure in the end we need to keep some of your income. melissa: that would make logical sense. peter, let me ask you. what is the maximum? at what point do you start doing harm to the economy? i think it is like 20%. but i think i'm a little low versus everyone else. >> well, sure think there. small businesses in new york city that mom-and-pop luncheonest on second avenue, they're paying marginal rates between the federal and state and payroll tax just there of over 50%. what is their incentive to put more capital at risk and expand and hire more people? it is not very good. b
. we had enough bellwethers, in tech and items, other areas of the economy to get an idea how earnings are going. what does that tell but the overall economy, what we've seen so far with earnings, john? >> our view is we're still in very luggish growth and real opportunities are coming out of the easy money policies of the central banks along with the emerging middle class in the developing world and so we're looking at, we're very bullish on commodities. we're very bullish on companies that produce those. companies that are helping find oil, that have sophisticated technology in the oil service area. we think the overall market is really still in a secular trading range that it has been in for the last 13 years and up at the upper boup drills of that. liz: john, are you spooked at all what seems years ago and it was earlier this week, the gdp of china missed estimates? it was lower than expected growth? and you still believe in commodities why? because a lot of chinese still need to be fed and need to build skyscrapers? what is the your focus here? absolutely. 7.7% gdp growth is still
workers is significant in our stagnant economy. the unemployment rate for blacks without a high school diploma was 12 percent, today, it's more than doubled, to 24.6%. now, that clearly shows that we have an oversupply of low skilled labor relative to the -- that is for workers in all such classes, particularly black americans, because research shows that 40 percent of the 18-point percentage decline in the employment rates of black males is attributable to illegal immigration. that's hundreds of thousands of blacks without jobs. it translates to hundreds of thousands who can't pay taxes, who don't support their families on their own dime. the evidence also indicated that in addition to the pressing wage -- sorry, employment levels, illegal immigration drove down wage levels, by the federal reserve bank of atlanta, for example, showed that illegal immigration, and the spike in illegal immigration, was attributable to the nearly $960 per year decrease in wage levels of documented georgians. and the leisure and hospitality industries, it was $1520. for doctors and lawyers, $960 may not b
: seasonally strong time of year for home sales. overall, the u.s. economy is running below its historical trend. this is a study done by the index. my next guest says the economy sluggish growth may be the most ideal condition for investors. joining us is now jack. welcome to you. >> thank you, lori. lori: you see this as a prime opportunity. some new investment dollars could go into the stock market. >> yes, potentially. fair value in the market is probably about 1520. we are slightly ahead of that. we have a lot of favorable factors. one, keep money. we have stocks that look cheap. if we can get confidence, you know, of investors, but also builds confidence picking up, i think you could see treasurers and armature treasurers start to exploit that difference. as long as the fed keeps the backdrop in place, then the market can go higher. we do not want to fall into a double dip type of scenario. on the other hand, we do not want anything too strong to suggest that perhaps the fed will take its foot off the accelerator. lori: if you have new money to invest, what type of stocks would you p
have had a broken system. it has been a drag on our economy. mr. holtz-eakin, thank you for your testimony. it will help minnesota businesses and families alike. i want to think the senators who ever done this, getting us as far as we have gotten. mr. holtz-eakin, one of the most things i have most pleased about is what it does for agriculture, particularly in minnesota. minnesota is one of the biggest dairy producers in our nation. dairy farmers have not been able to access the work force they have needed for years. one program that allows farmers to get guest workers is open only to seasonal workers, and you cannot milk cows seasonally. you could, but you would get very uncomfortable cows. i have been calling for this -- anyway. enough said. >> i used to be chairman of the senate agriculture committee. you are bringing back to my roots. >> vermont has a very great dairy-producing culture. i'm glad the gang of eight felt the same way. we have heard testimony on the issue of productivity. it seems having access to a dependable legal work force has got to be a boom for various par
, but until the economy improves they're the not going to get out of the way and i think because of that, this market will go up and more talk about that this week. >> we're only what, a couple-- we were down on the week about a couple hundred points, that's not a major selloff by any means. larry, thanks indeed. you're saying the market is trying to go up, we shall see. we have a news background, not yet occurred, at ten o'clock, half hour from now we're going to get the existing home sales, a very big pointing that is supposedly improving housing market. you'll get the numbers as we them, too. i want to warn you, coming up on friday, the latest gdp numbers, they're going to be inflated and show a rate of growth maybe 3%, very strong. but, there's a new calculation involved. so watch out there. the dow is now open for business. we're up 5 in the very early going, yeah, the up trend in place, first thing this monday morning. and why are we going to show you the price of a foreign corporation? why are we doing that? i'll tell you because the japanese stocks are going straight up as the ye
states competitive in our global economy. >> in order to get an outside opinion of what is going on in america, i traveled to germany -- he told up with me how things were done in germany. there are many such special in america. our apprenticeship program in germany is very dynamic. wasmerican friends surprised to see the same staff sweeping and serving. things areessary learned in the three-year apprenticeship. it serves as a worldwide example and should be maintained. >> apprentice ships? not a good enough? i needed some sort of explanation. that is why i spoke to the headmaster of westminster academy. >> one of the challenge that educators face is the changing of the family. there was a time in which the mother, father, children would be a home in which they would be growing up with both parents. now when students go to school in the only have one parent or there are issues in the home, they're bringing those challenges and to the classroom. what schools could should do it should help children love to learn, love to read, it becomes thinkers, become learners, become problem so
our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >> somebody clearly framed them. i don't know who exactly but by framed them and then shot the boy dead. i can't reach anyone. i don't know about my children. i'm scared for my boy. they will shoot him dead, and then just say, he had weapons. where can he get weapons for god's sake? they're picking them up at rubbish dumps or what? i'm scared for my son, for his life. they should arrest him. bring him alive. alive. in the judicial system should investigate everything, who is right and who is guilty. >> neil: that's the father of dzhokar tsarnev, still missing out there, still anywhere. trying to find him. the older brother was killed last night in the shootout. we agree on the key legal point, being preferable to catch the brother alive. >> many reasons, you want him alive, want to talk with him, interrogate him, want to know who was he with, who supplied these things? you think about the two young terrorists out there, they couldn't -- it's very unlikely they did everything all of t
obama, i sided with john kerry, i sided with barney frank. on ensuring our entire economy did not collapse. the bush administration for eight years had turned a blind eye to the fact that a casino had been set up on wall street that was now leading to a collapse of our economy. in 2008, i did not support any of the bush administration era financial regulation policies. but when the threat was that the system was going to collapse and hurt every family in america, i did vote to protect our financial system from collapsing and you did not. in addition, on telecommunications, yes, it was my legislation that broke down the telecom monopolies, cable monopolies that led to a broadband revolution beginning in 1996 that has created millions of jobs in the united states of america, including tens of thousands of them here in the massachusetts economy. and i'm very proud of that. and my name is on the legislation, steve. and i'm proud that my name is on much of that legislation because it was my job to go to washington -- >> that's my point. that's my point. you said we weren't -- that'
despite the fact that these jobs are among the highest paying and the most stable jobs in our economy today. it is imperative that we encourage more young americans n.i.t. e studies in the fields. in particular because of the stark racial and gender gaps we see in the programs, it is imperative that we encourage more young women and students of color to enter these fields. we simply won't be able to remain a global leader in these mportant fields without more -- with more than 50% of our nation's brainpower sitting on the sidelines. h.r. 967 doesn't go as far as i would like it to go in addressing these challenges but it does show the need to educate more students in n.i.t. fields and provide the necessary authority for the agencies to pay an important and appropriate role here. and finally, i would be remiss not to mention that nitr-d program serves as a coordinating and planning umbrella for all unclassified federal cybersecurity r&d. our committee addressed specific needs in cybersecurity , r&d separately in h.r. 756 but in doing so, we made sure that both the intellectual and fina
with the underpinnings of education and issues like that then allow us to be competitive in a global economy. i think the potential is there. we need to get our act together and that means we need to sit down, work together and resolve issues. .ost: larry, ohio independent caller. caller: good morning. host: good morning. caller: this gentleman keeps referring to the crime scenes, the violent crimes. 99% of us gun owners are law- abiding and that is the way we use our guns. internet sales -- you cannot ship a gun in the united states unless it is shipped by a fll dealer and once you receive that done at your dealer, you have to go through background checks. on the crystal ball thing -- host: larry, let me leave it there and have the congressman respond because that is the front page of "the new york times" dealing with internet sales. what do you make of his comment? guest: first of all, we do have background checks today, but the problem is there are loopholes. the number is about half of the gun sales in the country are not subject to a background check. some are emaciated on the internet. some are
on fixing it. immigration reform is vital to securing our borders, just starting our economy, and ensuring for access to that great american dream. the current status quo on immigration makes no sense. we turn away people from entering the country who could create thousands of jobs and let people crossing our borders who take away jobs. r oach ibanced. the border securitystro,ut achi. the path to citizenship is tough, but it is accessible. yes, our bill does secure the border first, but it treats the situation of those living in the shadows as an equally urgent priority. this is by design. we believe that americans will support sensible solutions to dealing with the undocumented and future legal immigrants, but only if they are convinced there will not be future waves of illegal immigrants. when the 11 million come out of the shadows and it will not only improve their lives and their families' lives, it will strengthen our country and its economies. in fact, conservative economist douglas holtz beacon has found that immigration reform will save taxpayers $2.70 trillion a. we what this legi
the winners or losers on april 29. >> finance ministers of the g-20 economies are softening their line on austerity. had a policy meeting in washington, d.c., they have agreed to set -- not to set hard targets. the discussions were dominated by talk of the struggling eurozone were harsh austerity measures have failed to lift the region out of its economic troubles. the german finance minister defended berlin's demands that the eurozone's troubled economies continue to cut spending. german shares fell for a sixth day in a row. their longest losing streak since november 2011, that amid disappointing earnings statements from some of the nation's largest companies. our correspondence sent us this summary from frankfurt. >> in the first quarter 2013, the software company has not been able to reach its goals, especially because of a far weaker than expected business in asia. sales have been far under estimates, and investors have been disappointed. they dragged down s&p shares by more than 2.5%, making them the leading loser -- >> saying the by a little early from frankfurt. let's take a clo
. for the travel industry, a key driver of the economy, we cannot afford to sit here and have congress pointing the finger at the administration, the administration putting the figure of congress. travelers are stuck in the airport. travel in this decrease over 7 billion jobs and supports those jobs each year. we cannot afford to be delayed in the airport. gerri: it does make a very big difference to our viewers. what you to respond to what the white house was saying today about this issue. listen to this. >> the faa, like other agencies, is personnel have the and in the end you cannot avoid when 70 percent of your budget of your operating budget is personnel you cannot avoid when the cuts are as deep as they are and the sequester, the kind of actions that are taken, these furloughs. that is the unfortunate fact of arbitrary across the board cuts like this. gerri: mike, you know, i want you to respond to that and also this, the faa knew the -- fa new these cuts were coming. what have they been doing? is some of this intentional? is some of this self-inflicted, what is going out? >> it is all in
and granger. that's a great tell of the real economy. boy, it's hard not to -- >> there's a lot going on regarding housing. we'll keep our eyes on the homebuilders. >> these people want to try to find a hole in the housing starts, good luck. this is a very big move and we're building far fewer homes than what are destroyed by fire and flood. a lot of people will live with their mother-in-laws. >> despite what we know about the price of building products, right? and the cost of contractors and electricians. >> and i think some of those costs again will come down. copper came down big, and aluminum bid. we'll take you to boston. we're expecting this to be the fbi in charge of the boston field office and deval patrick there and the u.s. attorney carmen ortiz. let's listen in. >> everyone, thank you for coming this morning. less than 24 hours after yesterday's act of terror we wanted to organize a briefing for you with the information that we have. the mayor is here, the members of our congressional delegation, all of the law enforcement leadership. we have several people who want to pres
to reduce the deficit in a balanced way, a way that doesn't punish the american people and our economy in the meantime. legislation that i'm proposing is simple. and it deserves quick approval. -- no reason to go back even though i would agree to it, let's -- to the buffett rule, let's do some spending cuts, do some more cutting, we've tried that. it wouldn't work. let's try the flexibility. that also won't work because you're dealing with the same amount of money. so i would hope that this simple solution i'm suggesting will be supported by my republican friends. establishing binding caps on war spending. the wars are winding down for certain. right now there's $650 billion there. and as this bill proposes, the one i will ask consent on, it will close that loophole and produce more than enough savings to offset the cost of delaying sequestration for five months. let's put a stop to the furloughs and delays that put a stop to the job losses. let's put a stop to the devastating cuts to programs that keep our poor children from getting an equal shot in life, our senior citizens, our home
know you're aware that six of the 10 fastest-growing economies in the world are located in sub-saharan africa, and it is my hope to the extent possible that the state department will prioritize trade with the african nation. you should know that we have a bipartisan bicameral effort working in conjunction with chairman smith to quickly put forward a renewal of the africa growth and opportunity act. so i have four questions i would like to ask you. i wanted to know what steps are you taking to focus on africa's extraordinary growth potential? what are your thoughts about the u.s. appointing a special envoy to the drc? does the request for peacekeeping operations accurately reflect the growing needs on the continent? and can you comment on the significance of the 6% cut to usaid hiv/aids funding? >> thank you very much, congresswoman. let me emphasize first of all that we were really pleased that pepfar was able to be held whole. i think that's vital. i have personally visited, i was in durbin, north of durbin, in the mountains watching of the program is being effectively adminis
.s. economy is headed south. lots of negative indicators recently, what do you say? >> i think that the u.s. economy is already in the south. if you will, and we don't show many signs of coming back, because of very bad policies coming out of washington. i mean, these things should be-- we should be lowering tax rates and broadening the tax base and controlling spending where it should be controlled and having free trade, minimal regulations, but we're going in the wrong direction, stuart. i think you're right. >> what about that question about everybody printing money? well, they are, we know that, but, i don't think it's working this time around. it's just not, you know, juicing the stock market like it used to. >> i don't think it used to so i agree with you totally. you can't push on a string and they have been trying to push on a string and if you look at it this is the single worst u.s. recovery in history and obviously, it's the largest single monetary expansion in history. and obviously, they don't work, they just don't work and he's grasping at straws and god knows what type of r
impact on how you look at the economy right now? are are you focused on other factors? >> at this point* i don't see them has any impact it is the actions going forward but it will not have an economic impact worries about people not wanting to go to a large sporting event and fortunately we have had these kinds of episodes before an economic impact has been negligent with so one of the event. but at this point* we did see an increase with the weekly consumer confidence numbers we get out from one survey. quite honestly it is said difficult and challenging period of time. i again, i step back but we are selling back into a realization it is a tough month for the economy. connell: to that point* to get away with the leading economic indicators came in looking at the dow and the generations the leading indicators declined does that tell you anything what was the message of that? >> of course, it doesn't tell us anything we don't know but it is amazing that shift in sentiment people have in the marketplace about the economy with the last four or eight weeks with the turn of the year and th
strong human rights prevail are countries where people do better. economies thrive, rule of law are stronger, governments are more effective and they are countries that leade wod stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't just an indicator that a country is doing well, it unleashes a country's potential and helps to advance growth and progress. i ask you to think of a country like berma for a minute. cause of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections a country that has been isolated for years is now making progress. has it reach wrd we want it to be? no but it is on the road and it is moving. more people are participating it ding to faster growth and development. by starting to embrace universal rights the bermese government is opening their doors and developing stronger partnerships around the world. many challenges remain, corruption has to be rooted out. political prisoners need to be freed. horrible mob violence is another stressing reminder on how long it takes to build what is called the habits of the
the economy. >> we ask what he would say. >> come see us in detroit, but there are a lot of great things happening here. .ome see what we are doing here >> many campaign promises were made. the most important should be the promised president obama made to himself. in for prestige or wanted to change the lives for the better. politics forinto prestige or wanting to change the lives for the better. the best way would be to change the people or communities the spur them to action. >> congratulations to all the winners. videos, andwinning studentcam.org. >> they say it is not perfect but it is a balance. the group is made up of senator mccain, rubio, d bennett. conference is 50 minutes. afternoon. we are here to announce that eight senators from opposite sides of the political aisle are coming together on a common sense immigration reform proposal we believe we can pass the senate. i want to thank my colleagues. each of us is strong-willed. each of us has differing beliefs, but if you would have seen that room in any of our meetings and seen anyone argue strongly but come together and realiz
. i know lgt runs some money that's invested into the russian economy. tell us a little bit about the character of this market and whether you can put cash to work here and feel comfortable that you are going to get a return. >> yep. we are invested in the russian market. but it's true, we have a lower allocation to it. the 11% toe 2% sounds quite low. it is a difficult way to access the markets. we see fundamentally from the point of view a strong currency. you look at low valuation, you look at the current surplus, you look at growing middle income class, which wants to consume, so key market indicators are actually strong. the challenge is much more the investment type. so we look at a narrow market, the way you invest is mainly into oil and energy companies. which most of them are state owned to the majority, so we end up being minority investors. what that means is it's still difficult for to us play to the russian growth topic investmentwise. what we can do is we can look at valuation, we can look at it from an optimal point of view. we can see if there is opportunities whic
buying and the stores and the economy feels and washingtwashingt on feels it >> what you have to do is give people permission and temporarily as a temporary solution. on your feelings right now. neil: they will clue themselves to their couch. >> not permanently nobody wants to be paralyzed by fear to stop living their lives you have to live your life and me appropriately concerned and vigilant but you can stop yourself from living and that is the general of vice -- advice. neil: to give their patients your cellphone number? >> they have it. they don't call me much. neil: to this point* we already had an economy slowing down and earnings we are looking at so even before boston and texas the economy is and was taking a hit. thank you orville and wilbur... ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't crea the future... by clinging to the past. and wi that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting hist
is broken. it doesn't meet the needs of our economy and security. we need to move forward with this debate on how to make sure that our immigration system moving forward does meet the needs. >> i'm hearing it sounds like a lot of the things i heard after 9/11 which is that you think really what is broken here when we are talking about this specific case is interagency cooperation. >> we have made great strides over the last ten or 11 years making sure there is better cooperation and communication. more needs to be done. in the case of boston the two suspects we weren't able to track their movements, what they were doing and making sure that we had a handle on some of the folks that did have the opportunity or the proclivity to be involved in terrorism activities. >> if you watched yesterday some serious fireworks during the judiciary committee hearing. let me play that for folks. >> if you have ways to improve the bill, offer an amendment when we start mark up in may. i say that particularly those who are pointing to what happened, the terrible tragedy in boston as i would say an excuse fo
nearly 158 points while the nasdaq closed up 48. restored confidence in the world's number one economy sent asian stocks higher this morning. tokyo's nikkei rose 1%. hong kong's hang seng added a fraction. >>> more signs the housing market is recovering. builders started work on a million new homes in march. that hasn't happened since june 2008. and it was fueled by a surge in apartment building construction but single-family home construction fell by nearly 5%. >>> the international monetary fund now predicts global economy will grow by 3.3% this year. that's down two-tenths of a point since its january forecast. the imf says the u.s. economy will expand by a slightly smaller 1.9% while the eurozone economies were shrink slightly. back to you. >> and we understand car ownership and believe me we all know this here in san francisco but it comes with a big price tag, too, doesn't it? >> it sure does. a new report out by aaa found that owning an average sedan will drain about $9,100 a year from your wallet when you factor in gas, insurance and maintenance and tires and that cost is actu
for the sequester, which is currently having and will have a very, very negative effect on our economy, on jobs, and on the confidence that americans have that we are pursuing rational policy. the the gentleman and i both have agreed that sequester is not a rational policy. it deals with high priority and low priority items in very much the same way. so my question, mr. leader, is there a possibility, not on the calendar, you didn't announc it, bui w you that we go to conference, preferably, the first day we are back, after this weekend, so that we could get to work on trying to get to an agreement on one of the most pressing problems in front of this country, and that's getting ourselves on a fiscally sustainable path. i yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman. i appreciate the spirit with which he recommends that we proceed along the lines of those individuals that he spoke about had asked for. and i would say to the gentleman, mr. speaker, that i'm told that our chairman and the chairman on the other side of the capitol, ms. murry, they are meeting and looking to see the path f
% of poll, only americans think that control is an important problem mostly economy in general, 24% think that is most important. federal budget deficit and federal debt is 11%. here is the front page of "the new york daily news," -- lindsay is an independent here in washington d.c.. you are on "washington journal." am really sad and i want to make sure if one does in this country that 31,000 people per year are killed by guns. this is a normal and we did this is a horrible number for its allies civilization. horrible number for a civilization. stronger gun laws can make a difference. calling in.you for this is the front page of " the washington times." michael is from rockville center, new york. caller: the reason this legislation failed is not only would it have not prevented the terrible tragedy that occurred in connecticut but also the tragedy in colorado. abroad is lacking because it would appear both parties have used this issue to raise money and at the same time not really address it responsibly. i think most americans are on to the fact that would appear you bringin -- that what
on "starting point." ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i work for 47 different companies. well, technically i work for one. that company, the united states postal service® works for thousands of home businesses. because at usps.com® you can pay, print and have your packages picked up for free. i can even drop off free boxes. i wear a lot of hats. well, technically i wear one. the u.s. postal service®, no business too small. >>> welcome back to "starting point," "minding your business" this morning. stock futures pointing to higher open. it would be a rebound from big losses last week. dow up and opens for real in two hours. $333 million. that's one estimate of how much it cost to shut down boston for the die. the area produces $325 billion worth of goods and services every year. that's a little less than a billion dollars a day. the ninth largest gdp in the country and friday everything stopped. businesses, public transit, colleges, shopping centers shut. now many people were at home. but others could
the economy grow and create jobs, protect the middle class, and protect seen yours. the president is engaged in a process with lawmakers where he's trying to find commonground to see if commonground exists with republicans around the basic principle to reduce the budget in a balanced way, and he's put forward a plan that would do that eliminating the sequester in the process. when it comes to delays, though, congress has to act in order to avert delays. >> prioritizing spending under the faa, but you want the sequester to inflict maximum -- >> since we did everything we could to avert the sequester, and, unfortunately, the republicans decided as a political matter it was a home run for them to inflick this upon the american people, i think that suggestion just doesn't hold water. secondly, the faa did take action, all the action it could under the law to produce savings and avoid furloughs up until this point where because of the nature of their budget and the personnel heavy nature of their operation furloughs are the only option available to the faa at this time. again, if congress wants t
economy work and define those things that are going to lead our country forward. it is a privilege to be here with you talking about ideas from the working families flexibility act that you are working hard on and i'm a proud co-sponsor but also ways we are going to find solutions for people across this country who are raising families, trying to pay for college trying to pay the energy bill for the month. mr. gardner: we have an incredible opportunity to get government out of the way and let america work, to unleash the entrepreneurs around this great nation over the past several months over the past couple of years, we have held dozens of town meetings, whether they are in southeastern colorado, northeastern colorado, the denver metro area, the new parts of my district, talking to families, talking to people who are struggling to make ends meet. people who have had to pick up a second job just to pay the bills. and as we talk tonight about making life work and i believe #makinglifework and i would like to hear from people around the country how we an help be a part of these solut
will go. and sometimes invest in a place where the economy is not where it would support necessarily a market solution, which is why a.i.d. has to be there. so you've got the millennium challenge corporation over here, a.i.d. as the preponderance of our expenditure, but it has adopted significant reforms in the last years that have actually movement some of the development challenge kinds of enterprize into a.i.d. wherever we can we are trying to do economic-based aid in a local way that is sustainable. and that will result in long-term gains, not a project that comes, and when the project's over the money's gone and there is nothing to show for it. but there are someplaces where you still have humanitarian demands and other demands that will not lend themselves to that, and we just need to understand that. we have to understand that's for the minimum -- minimalist fraction of the percentage of our aid that may represent, it's still an expression of our values and interest and it's important. now we are -- i'm not going to sit here and tell this committee that the job is done. we are
. it begins to affect the economies in the area. certainly within the district i represent. yet there's always a persistent demand for more. the persistent demand usually comes from washington and not the border communities that they want more. some of those communities are the safest in the country. but the fact remains that if we are going to make security the linchpin and put dollars on top of dollars, taxpayer money, and there's a lack of transparency and oversight, i am not sure that this is not just become another symbolic gesture and the outcome continues to be one that is in doubt and people keep demanding more. host: for yourself representing a border state, as co-chairman of the progressive caucus, if any legislation that comes to be in the house and senate include border security as the linchpin to a pathway to citizenship, the border has to be secure before the 11 million people can get on a pathway to citizenship, if that's the case, are you a yes vote? guest: no. arbitrary triggers should not be part of the legislation. it's my understanding that there been a time of three years
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, united healthcare, , and fidelity investments. what a personal economy looks like. and as lifehangfidelity can help you readjust your investments along the way. refocus as careers change and kids and head off to college. and rebuild your plan. wherever you are today, fidelity's guidance can help you refine your
are characterizing this as a real threat to kill people, hurt economy.and a threat to the you know, they are cautious in saying that this was an imminent threat but it was not an aimminent but no less a very real threat. what's interesting here, jake, is they refused to release any information regard the search warrants. i tell you they have a good handful of plots under surveillance right now, and i've been briefed on a few of them. what they do is they continue from the very instant they seize on communication or anything that is suspicious, they then start to try and gain the authority to be able to bug their mobile phones, bug their homes, do whatever they need to do to keep the public safe. it seems to be what's happened at this point in time. they still say that the searches -- that the execution of those search warrants is ongoing, which is key what they find there. will they find explosives, the beginnings of a bomb, or will they find more stuff on computer hard drives, phone calls in question, things like that which would make the plot more aspirational. the other thing is, jake, they said t
. the commission says there's no immediate danger to consumers, but it could be costly to the eurozone economy, and tighter measures are planned. france, greece and denmark had the highest amounts of horse meat in beef. devry, inc., which operates private colleges and training schools, is being investigated by officials in two states. the attornies general of both illinois and massachusetts are investigating. illinois is looking into incentive-based compensation, illegal under laws governing schools participating in federal aid programs. massachusetts wants to know if devry filed false information about its students. devry says it is cooperating with the investigations. general motors edges out volkswagen in first quarter sales as both try to catch up to toyota. gm sold 2.36 million cars and trucks around the world in the first three months of 2013. volkswagen sold 2.27 million vehicles during that same time. toyota was in the lead with most cars sold in 2012. rising maintenance costs are making owning a car more expensive. aaa says car expenses are up 2% from last year. the average sedan now
ecoboost fuel economy, and a whole lot more. go further. >>> dozens of residents in west texas remain unaccounted for tonight. the blast created a seismic event leveling a large swath of the town. but what caused this mysterious disaster. we search for the answers. >> reporter: the fire at the fertilizer plant here rocked this small town to its core. >> everybody needs to get away from there. back all trucks away from the plant. >> reporter: 7:29 p.m. yesterday, a fire raged. the flames so big, so bright, neighbored out their cameras and hit record. then at 7:53, the one thing that everyone watching feared the most. >> i can't hear. >> let's get out of here, please, get out of here. >> a father with his daughter right beside him in the car captures it all. their voices turn to terror. >> dad, please get out of here. >> the girl heard screaming is 12-year-old chloe. her father had stopped at a nearby school when they saw the smoke. >> we knew it was an explosion. we didn't think it was going to be that bad. >> reporter: the fertilizer depot, part of this west, texas, landscape for more
trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> we showed you this at the top of the hour, fenway park. this is one of the most visible signs that boston is beginning to heal. right now, fenway park is alive with red sox fans cheering on their home team and their hometown. the world is cheering on boston and the red sox. poppy harlow joins me live at the ballpark. poppy, would i want to be the team that beats boston now? >> reporter: i do not think you would, don. all is fair in love and war in professional sports i suppose, but i don't know, this is a city, a country rooting for the boston red sox. this is the first home game since the bombing at the monday marathon. they have a tradition of having a morning home game before the marathon on monday and then running the marathon. and it is this entire citywide celebration. this is the first time back at fenway. want to show you this poster. people walking in holding this, boston strong. and you see from the video all of the people extremely excited and proud to be bostonians. special ceremony
or entity that recognized the importance of preventing further deterioration in the local economy and agreed to take responsibility for the effort to turn things around. the leader help facilitate collaboration which was essential not only because economic development is complicated and multidimensional but also for them more mossadegh reasoned that outside funders would require that all interested stakeholders commit to a strategic direction. the specific avenues to recover. among their cities identified in the boston study. some built on traditional strengths while others created new businesses from scratch. for example grand rapids michigan once known for its furniture manufacturing work to become a major medical center partnering with michigan state university in grand valley state universities to form the research center. similarly as in jersey city has successfully transformed itself from a manufacturing-based economy to a financial center. its proximity to new york city makes this transformation seem obvious in hindsight but other similarly situated cities have not made comparable str
people killed in yesterday's bombings. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. [ beeping ] ♪ [ male announcer ] we don't just certify our pre-owned vehicles. we inspect, analyze and recondition each one, until it's nothing short of a genuine certified pre-owned... mercedes-benz for the next new owner. ♪ hurry in to your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for 1.99% financing during our certified pre-owned sales event through april 30th. >>> breaking news, a moment of silence was held before the opening of the baseball game in cleveland. >> a moment of silence for the victims of yesterday's tragedy in boston. we all stand as one with the people of boston in a time of grief and pain and express our support for their healing and recovery in the days ahead. please join us now in a moment of silence. thank you all very much. >> still to come, what we are learning about the explosive devices used during the attack. the chairman of the house homeland security committee mike mccall has been briefed and he's going to c
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